Mindomo to create collaborative mind maps in math

Today in Grade 9 Applied Math class we were reviewing our first topics of study. Students created collaborative mindmaps using all the vocabulary, shapes (visuals) and formulas we’ve used so far. What a great way to consolidate our three main learning goals so far;

– I can solve problems involving area and perimeter of composite 2D shapes

– I can solve problems involving volume of 3D shapes (prisms, pyramids, spheres)

– I can solve problems involving pythagorean theorem

 

Setting up an assignment on Mindomo is super easy. I could pre-populate a mindmap with some of the basic vocabulary to save students time. Having groups of 2 or 3 each access their collaborative mindmap from their own computers was helpful to ensure all were on task and contributing. It also forced discussions around the vocabulary and characteristics to determine how they would structure/organize their mindmap. Some excellent math talk happened today. I find mindmaps can help students see the big picture and how all the concepts fit together. This holistic view is important for many learners (and is highlighted as a research-based method of high success for First Nation learners).

Many students enjoyed adding in images and links to examples in addition to the basic vocabulary. Comparing how different groups organized their mindmaps added some rich discussion.

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YOU can learn how to use Mindomo (Ontario teachers) by attending OTF’s Connect webinar on April 9th.

 

Co-Teaching in Grade 9 Math

This semester I have been given the opportunity to co-teach a couple grade 9 applied mathematics classes. I am officially the teacher for one of the classes and I am a math SERT (special education resource teacher) in the other class. However, both of our classes are following a co-teach model. We are alternating who is instructing or “running the show” while the other is conferencing with, supporting specific learning needs and observing students. The students think we are just both their teachers. They see no difference between our roles.

Unlike most teachers, I’ve personally had many opportunities to co-teach, co-plan and observe others teach. After only a week, I am already realizing how it is even richer to watch how YOUR students respond, behave and learn during lessons. The ability to step back in your own classroom and observe students is something we rarely have the opportunity to do. After only a few days, I feel as though I already have a better handle on my students and their needs than I would have after a month of teaching on my own.

We always talk about providing students with ongoing, timely feedback, and yet as teachers we rarely get feedback on our work. When you work to continuously co-plan and co-teach with another teacher the professional dialogue is integrated into your day. The 5-10 minute check in before school starts, the time during our prep period, the quick check-in over lunch hour and then the 10 minutes after class. This immediate dialogue and feedback is authentic, focused on student learning and never obscured by any feeling of assessment or evaluation. We’re in it together. The discussion is simply on what we can do to improve student learning.

In both the grade 9 math classes we are building in a method for timely, descriptive feedback for students as well. With two teachers in the room, one can spend the time each day to conference with each student who struggled with yesterdays concepts. The goal being to ensure students never get further than that one concept behind. While all teachers try this, in a busy class, it often becomes impossible. We easily are able to do that when co-teaching.

I have never been more excited to teach. I have a whole host of crazy things I want to try with my grade 9 applied mathematics class including;

  • OneNote class notebook with Wacom writing tablets (plug into laptops like a mouse to allow writing) for ongoing assessments and portfolios (we have a BYOD program where all students bring their own laptops)
  • ClassFlow with Wacom tablets for interactive math lessons
  • a classroom culture supporting a growth mindset and resilience
  • learning through inquiry for most, if not all concepts
  • integrating a couple games (Minecraft and DragonBox) to investigate mathematical concepts through
  • integrating some First Nation culture and outdoor education by completing some investigations into the math found in dreamcatchers and archery
  • integrating some art into mathematics by providing choices for inquiry that include connections to art (TurtleArt, visual arts, music)

With a full class of 24 students and 12 of these students with individual education plans, I was very worried about my ability to try these new things in addition to providing enough opportunities and entry points for all students in the class to access the content. Having two teachers in the room and the embedded professional support this provides has given me the confidence to try many new things in one semester.

What a great opportunity! Have you ever had the opportunity to co-teach an entire semester or extended period of time? If so, do you have any tips and tricks to provide for us?